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Remembering Honoured Member Bill Page

Remembering Bill Page -Kynan Vine  Article from
Article from Everything Cowboy.com

It is with heavy hearts that we say goodbye to our friend Bill Page.

For those in the rodeo world Bill is best known for the bull ropes he made. Growing up in the Medicine Hat area, rodeo came naturally to Bill. In the 70's some of the greatest rodeo cowboys in Canada were calling Medicine Hat home and Bill was fortunate enough to hang around them.

After a short career in the arena Bill turned his attention to building bull ropes and the rest was history. Bill has made bull ropes for some of the best bull riders in the world and in certain years built bull ropes for every bull rider and steer rider competing at the CFR. The list of names who have rode with a Bill Page rope, which reads more like bull ridings Hall of Fame, spans from the 70's and includes the Johansen Brothers, Jim Lawrence, Scott Schiffner, Darryl Mills, Cody Snyder, Chad Besplug, Tanner Girletz, Devon Mezei, Billy Jones, Kelly Armstrong, Robert Bowers, Austin Beasley and the list could go on for three pages.

There is no doubt in any bull riders mind that the bull rope is the cornerstone of riding bulls. When you talk to Scott Schiffner he will tell you that there was nothing better than a brand new Bill Page rope to make you feel like you could ride any bull. Bill always stood behind his work and if someone didn't get along with a rope or it didn't last the way they needed it to, Bill would fix it or build them a new rope. For most that started buying ropes from Bill as steer riders the price of the rope never increased from there. Bill was the true picture of a cowboy, his hand shake was his word and he always got the job done.

I was fortunate enough to have known Bill for pretty much my entire life. With my dad as the president of Box Springs Rodeo, a good portion of my childhood was spent out that the rodeo grounds preparing for the rodeo weekend. A small group of volunteers would regularly meet to build fence or repair buildings and Bill and Rosemary were often there to lend a hand. Bill always greeted you with a big smile and a warm hand shake and had the ability to make you feel like you were the most important person in the room. When I entered my first Box Springs Rodeo as a steer rider is was proud to say I was riding with a Bill Page rope, even if it was a hand me down from my brother. For a kid riding steers back then riding with a Bill Page rope was like owning the latest iPhone today, you just had to have one.

Where I got to spend most of my time with Bill was down at the Medicine Hat Boxing Club. For over 40 years this is where Bill could be found during the week nights and this is where he was truly in his element. For those who haven't had the good fortune of walking down the old wooden stairs into the basement of the Kiwanis club, it is like a scene from every epic boxing movie you have ever watched and for a first time visitor can be quite intimidating. But there was Bill standing in the middle of the room, wearing a smile from ear to ear, to greet you with a handshake and make you feel as though you were coming home.

Bill has had a famed career as a boxing coach which includes coaching many young boxers to provincial, national and even Olympic tournaments with many of Canada's greatest champions coming from the tutelage of Bill. Bill founded the Medicine Hat Boxing in 1976. He was instrumental in developing amateur boxing coaches, athletes, and officials. . Bill Page was the President of Boxing Alberta in 1983, and served on the board for nine years. He was also a member of the Canadian Amateur Boxing Association executive for six years. Bill was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame in recognition of all his contributions to the sport of boxing in 2005.

Bill wasn't just a coach that would teach you how to throw the perfect jab, although he did do that, he was a mentor and could inspire a young boxer to believe they were a champion in the ring and in life. Bill had his own battles to overcome throughout his life and when he would tell you he ran 10 miles along the river while dealing with his asthma and arthritis it would make you want to be better. Bill didn't just mold people into good boxers, he molded them into good people.

I have never met another person who takes such joy and pride in helping another person find their confidence. Whether it was teaching you a right hook or teaching you how to shake a hand Bill made you believe you could be better and when you walked up the stairs from that old basement you felt like you could take on the world. Bill taught me that how you do anything is how you do everything so always give it your best. There is no doubt that right up till the end Bill gave it his best.

The rodeo and boxing worlds have said goodbye to a legend and you can be sure that those boots are going to be tough to fill. Adios Bill.

Okotoks Grand Slam and Honoured Member Kevin Martin

Masters Grand Slam of Curling coming to Okotoks
Article from Okotoks Western Wheel

The Okotoks curling community has hit a grand slam.

Okotoks will welcome the top men's and women's teams the roaring game has to offer next year as it was announced as the host of the 2016 Masters Grand Slam of Curling to be held Oct. 25-30 at the Pason Centennial Arena.

"It will bring together the 15 top men's, 15 top women's teams in the world. It will include Canadian, world and Olympic champions," said Ron McLaren, chairman of the Okotoks Curling Club's executive committee. "The Masters is one of the original Grand Slam events. It's considered a very prestigious title in the world of curling and has been won by some of the best teams in the world."

One such past champion was on hand for the announcement, 2003 Masters winner and 2010 Olympic and world champion curler Kevin Martin.

"I really appreciate Okotoks. I've been coming here for many years. It's such a sporting town," said Martin, now a broadcaster with Sportsnet. "The Grand Slam of Curling, it's all about the growth of the game, that's what it is."

Next year will mark a season of unprecedented growth for the Grand Slam series with Okotoks on board as one of the biggest number of tour dates in the circuit's history.

"Last year the Grand Slam of Curling property had five events, this year the Grand Slam property had seven events," Martin added. "Next year, with Okotoks part of it, it will be the biggest curling property in the world with eight events and $2.5 million in prize money.

"That is a large deal in our sport."

The event, co-hosted by the Town of Okotoks and Okotoks Curling Club, has been held in Canada since 2002 yet the 2016 Masters will mark the first time Alberta has hosted the Masters in the history of the Grand Slam.

"It's so exciting for Okotoks to have this opportunity to showcase our community as a first-class sporting destination," said Okotoks Town Councillor Ken Heemeryck. "And to be able to present such a prestigious event on a national scale."

The event will be broadcast nationally on Sportsnet as part of the channel's coverage of the Grand Slam of Curling.

"Through social media, internet, press, television coverage provided by Rogers Sportsnet, who own and operate the series, the event will bring great exposure to our area," McLaren added. "We hope to work with local and regional businesses to ensure the event showcases our amazing community and what it has to offer."

In the meantime, the executive committee featuring McLaren, Debbie Miller, Gail Giroux and Susan Lypkie is calling on volunteers to help tackle the challenge of hosting an event with such magnitude in the world of curling.

"The next 13 months is going to be extremely busy," McLaren said. "We are looking for volunteers and business partners to make the 2016 Masters the most successful Grand Slam event ever held."

Those interested in getting involved can email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit okotokscurling.com and find the Grand Slam volunteer link on the homepage.

A Short History of the Lethbridge Pronghorns

A Humble Beginning - Lethbridge Herald Article

A group of university-aged ringette players toil away one-and-a-half times a week for the U of L Pronghorns.  Obscurity would be an upgrade from their current stature, as the University of Lethbridge's ringette team — they compete in a university league, but are not a varsity team.  It's a humble beginning, to be sure.

This is a few years in already and the team has gone from asking players to attend tryouts to cutting players. They've raised a scholarship and they volunteer for the school's Operation Red Nose campaign, which supports Pronghorn varsity athletes.  This week, the team met with university athletics officials who have expressed public support of the squad. That athletic director Ken McInnes attended a game recently was a big win. That they had a meeting scheduled was another.  Are these the humble beginnings of something bigger?

It is a team held together by passion, determination and a little bit of defiance. There's a chip on the shoulder of these women. There's also a love of their sport. A Canadian invention, ringette isn't "hockey with a ring" — it's more like basketball on ice. With sticks. And a ring.  Members of the Pronghorns have adopted and sponsor a Lethbridge Ringette Association team and other players help out with coaching. They're planning a skills camp and they've partnered with the Lethbridge

Members of the Pronghorns have adopted and sponsor a Lethbridge Ringette Association team and other players help out with coaching. They're planning a skills camp and they've partnered with the Lethbridge Sport Council to increase their profile.Players drive themselves to games in Calgary, Edmonton — wherever they can. Trevor Hall drives in once a week from Calgary to help coach. His daughter plays on the team, and he loves the sport.

Players drive themselves to games in Calgary, Edmonton — wherever they can. Trevor Hall drives in once a week from Calgary to help coach. His daughter plays on the team, and he loves the sport.Coach Meryl McKinnon has been here since the start, pouring time, money, heart and soul into the

Coach Meryl McKinnon has been here since the start, pouring time, money, heart and soul into the endeavour. They're fighting for funding, awareness and a shot at becoming a varsity sport.  But while they dream about being a fully funded Pronghorn team, their expectations are realistic.Are these the humble beginnings?  Are these the humble beginnings?

The Pronghorn women's rugby team has won three national championships and beginning this season added a full-time head coach.  McKinnon, a rugby player herself, knows the history of the U of L's rugby team. She knows it started with a group of passionate coaches and players. Those coaches drove the bus, bought the gear and even rented the bus. Those were some humble beginnings, for a three-time, Alberta Sports Hall of Fame team.

Those were some humble beginnings, for a three-time, Alberta Sports Hall of Fame team.

The ringette squad hopes to clear the birth canal one day. Until then, they're still incubating.

"Our girls pay to play," said McKinnon during the team's weekly practice at Nicholas Sheran Arena. They also get an ice time every other week. "And yet we still have girls who are here so that they can play ringette."

The team competes in the University Challenge Cup against teams from across Canadian Inter-University Sport. While none of them are varsity teams, many of the other programs are more-tenured and receive financial support from the school. McKinnon doesn't begrudge them that support."Some of these programs have been around for ages, like the U of A," she said. "They get support from the community, they're in cities with bigger ringette associations or they have more support from the university.

"Some of these programs have been around for ages, like the U of A," she said. "They get support from the community, they're in cities with bigger ringette associations or they have more support from the university."We're still pretty new, even though we're very competitive, we're one of the newer teams."

"We're still pretty new, even though we're very competitive, we're one of the newer teams."These Horns have come a long way in a few years. At first, it was a team which offered a spot for women to play competitive ringette. The city had a recreational women's team in the LRA, but for stronger players, there were no options. Now, the women cut by the U of L team can play on a B team while the U of L women

These Horns have come a long way in a few years. At first, it was a team which offered a spot for women to play competitive ringette. The city had a recreational women's team in the LRA, but for stronger players, there were no options. Now, the women cut by the U of L team can play on a B team while the U of L women act a de facto A team. The C team, for less competitive players, is still active.For the LRA, which McKinnon said has been very supportive, it gives girls playing minor ringette a place to play.

For the LRA, which McKinnon said has been very supportive, it gives girls playing minor ringette a place to play."There weren't a lot of options for girls who came out and still wanted to play after they turned 18," she said. "Especially for the better players. We started out just as a way to get girls playing but this year, we've got a really strong team and we had to cut some girls.

"There weren't a lot of options for girls who came out and still wanted to play after they turned 18," she said. "Especially for the better players. We started out just as a way to get girls playing but this year, we've got a really strong team and we had to cut some girls."It's grown every year."

"It's grown every year." That's the message McKinnon wants to give the university.  As a U of L graduate herself, McKinnon said she's looking for a teaching job locally while also running the team. As long as she can stay in Lethbridge, she'll keep pushing. Giving up isn't an option.  "I don't know what's going to happen, but I think we contribute a lot to the community and the school," she said.

Support comes not just from the players, their parents and the LRA, but proponents like U of L Rec Services program manager Bill Halma. Rugby star Nicole Ronsky also made sure to drop the ringette team into a recent Herald interview.  It all helps.

"We're trying to prove something, not just by winning games," she said. "I mean, these girls go to school, they work. It's not easy but they're great about it. They volunteer their time and I'd love to see if Ken can help us out in any way."

McKinnon said her players respect the Pronghorn logo they wear on their gear. Her expectations? She said she'd love to see the roster on the gohorns.ca website.  That would help with recruitment and sponsorship support. It would give the players a sense of belonging to that Pronghorn community.
It would be a humble beginning.

A humble beginning

Honoured Member Glen Sather is honoured by Edmonton Oilers

‘Welcome home Slats’: Edmonton honours Oilers great Glen Sather

Article from Global News

He coached the Edmonton Oilers to four Stanley Cup championships and by the end of this week he will join the ranks of nine other Oilers greats by having a banner raised in his honour at Rexall Place.

The recognition will be given to Glen Sather before Friday night's Oilers game against the New York Rangers but there is much fanfare leading up to the main event.

Edmonton Oilers release details about Glen Sather ceremony 1984 Championship team reunion; October 8, 2014 Former Oilers reunite in Edmonton to remember 1984 Stanley Cup win The celebration got underway Wednesday, when four former Oilers captains who played during the Sather era shared their memories of 'Slats,' as he's known. Craig MacTavish, Kevin Lowe, Al Hamilton and Kelly Buchberger spoke to the media while in Edmonton for the events later this week. The common theme was how much Sather cared about his players.

"I remember vividly when Don Cherry made disparaging remarks about Randy Gregg and Randy's ability, and Glen forced or made Don Cherry come and apologize to the team in front of everybody at a team lunch," Lowe said.

"With Glen, he always wanted to make our team a family and you're always accountable for yourself... and if you got in trouble you'd have to contact him first but unfortunately sometimes I didn't contact him and I would get scolded and maybe that's why he left me unprotected in the '99 expansion draft and never told me," Buchberger added with a laugh.

On Thursday, a public ceremony was held at the Winspear Centre to honour Sather.

The main event happens Friday night at Rexall Place when Sather will join Al Hamilton, Wayne Gretzky, Jari Kurri, Grant Fuhr, Paul Coffey, Mark Messier, Glenn Anderson and long-time radio broadcaster Rod Phillips who already have banners hanging from the rafters. The ceremony starts at 6:20 p.m., before the puck drops.

Sather was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1997. He won four Stanley Cups as the Oilers head coach (1984-88) and a fifth in 1990 as the team's president and general manager.

Sather played 10 NHL seasons with the Boston Bruins, Pittsburgh Penguins, New York Rangers, St. Louis Blues, Montreal Canadiens and Minnesota North Stars, accumulating 192 points (80 goals, 112 assists). He also appeared in 72 playoff games.

Sather played one season with the Oilers in 1976-77 when the team was part of the World Hockey Association.

With files from The Canadian Press.

Joe Moss remains an inspiration

Article from Edmonton Sun - Author Cam Tait

Joe Moss was shown to the front row of the main banquet room of the Ramada Hotel and Conference Centre Thursday morning. For Joe, who has Down syndrome, such treatment isn't at all foreign.

He very well could be the most recognizable person in Edmonton with a disability, who loves to sing O Canada. And that's what Joe thought he was in for: singing O Canada — with the same fervour and gusto he does before every Edmonton Oiler home game — to start International Day of Persons with Disabilities.

When he was done, he quietly walked back to his front row seat and sat to the right of his brother Steve.

But not for long.

Carmen Wyton of the Premier's Council on the Status of Persons with Disabilities took to the stage and called Joe back to the podium.

Joe was named this year's recipient for the Marlin Styner Achievement Award, one of the council's most prestigious honours.

Never one to shy away from a microphone, Joe stepped up for an impromptu acceptance speech to the crowd numbering close to 300.

"I'm happy," he said.

"I thank my family.

Brother Steve quietly left his seat to join Joe on the stage. Steve gently patted Joe on the back and then took the mic to express his own appreciation.

The Joe Moss story has been documented countless times but never loses its magic.

"It's inspirational," Steve said after the program.

Indeed. Joe was working at a bottle depot 32 years ago when his sister Vikki Moss was dating Edmonton Oiler Wayne Gretzky. Joe loved hockey, so Gretzky asked the Oiler management if Joe could help the trainers in the locker room.

And he's still doing his job — and for the Edmonton Eskimos, too.

Speaking of the Eskimos, Joe had another surprise earlier this week when he was working in the team's Commonwealth Stadium dressing room. Next thing Joe knows, some of the players arrived carrying the Grey Cup from Sunday's win.

It's been quite the year for Joe. In May he was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame in Red Deer.

"That was special because Joe is up there with all the great athletes," Steve said.

"But this award is very special, too."

Steve says finding out about Styner, the man the award is named after, gives Thursday's event more meaning.

Styner was a quadriplegic who was a tireless fighter for the rights and dignity of people with disabilities in the Red Deer area. He was chair of the Premier's Council and died in 2014.

His wife Diane was in Edmonton to see Joe get the award.

Joe Moss continues to be a role model — and is rightly deserving of his awards.

"We never, ever thought Joe would be recognized like he has been," Steve says, representing the consensus of his 12 siblings.

"We're just so happy he's been able to do so much and people recognize him. We're often out together and people come up to Joe and ask him for his autograph."

Joe's accomplishments, and those of other award-winners, will hopefully pave new paths for people with disabilities.

That's the mandate of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities. And as long as we have leaders making significant contributions, the event can't help but grow.

Canada's Walk of Fame Recognizes Honoured Member Ron MacLean

Don Cherry, Ron MacLean among newest members of Canada's Walk of Fame - Article from Toronto Sun

Hockey broadcasters Don Cherry and Ron MacLean say they're a team and wanted to be inducted as such into Canada's Walk of Fame.

The Coach's Corner duo received their stars on Saturday at Toronto's Sony Centre.

"It's such an honour to be on such a great team," MacLean said. "It was a huge break for me back in 1986. Don has taught me so much. He protected me and gave me advice on how to deal with the NHL. I was a deer in the headlights."

Cherry said he never thought 31 years ago he and MacLean would earn such an honour.

"I don't win many awards," Cherry said wearing a white linen jacket with black polka-dots.

"I think the secret to success is to never figure out what you are doing or you will screw it up."

Fellow inductee Michael Buble has a shelf full of music industry awards, including Grammys and Junos, and says he attributes his success to his Canadian roots.

"My culture and Canadian heritage separates me from others and has helped with my success," the crooner said. "I think sometimes we feel like the underdogs, but that's why we are the favourites."

"We are funny, dirty, kind and compassionate. I think I just wrote a song. It is great to have a night like this."

Canadian actor Jason Priestley hosted the gala for a second year in a row.

"What excites me most about presenting is it is all about celebrating Canadians and I love to celebrate Canada," he said. "I had such a great time last year, I agreed to do it again."

Olympian Silken Laumann, author Lawrence Hill, and actor Wendy Crewson were also inducted Saturday, and actor Lorne Greene was awarded a posthumous star.